Managing the Nonprofit Facility: Renovations and Construction

December 12, 2014
| by Guest Contributor |

One of the most challenging tasks for many nonprofit organizations is the job of adapting their physical facilities to their evolving functional needs within the limits of their financial resources.

The nonprofit facility is often constantly evolving. From routine and cyclical maintenance to meeting the needs of a new mission-critical program, existing facilities may need to be expanded, renovated, or reconfigured; or a new facility may need to be planned and built. Projects have to be put together to achieve those results. Planning, organizing and managing a project can be a daunting proposition for an organization that does not execute projects on a regular basis.

Through a new partnership with the Atlanta Chapter of International Facilities Management Association (IFMA Atlanta), a group of nonprofit facility managers just completed the inaugural five-part Certificate of Nonprofit Facility Management at GCN’s Nonprofit University. As part of that curriculum, Ken Stephenson and Ken Bryson presented a course on Renovations and Construction. Both are architects at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and members of IFMA Atlanta.

As part of this interactive session, the presenters provided basic tools that the Facility Manager (FM) can use when faced with a project. In order to successfully manage a renovation or construction project, FMs  need to understand how to meet the project objectives within the parameters of scope, schedule and budget. Below, you may explore some of the take-home practical information from the course, valuable to nonprofit FMs as they work to make their facilities support the larger mission of their organizations with minimum impact on program dollars.

What is a Project?

·         A project is an activity intended to deliver a measurable result within a set of defined parameters.

·         All projects reach a conclusion, that is, they have an end point. A repeated activity is not a project.

·         Every project is unique – formed to solve a specific problem or capture an opportunity.

·         Every project must be managed. Hence it needs a project manager, who is key to the progress and success of the project.

What is Project Management? 

·         Project management (PM) is the art of directing and coordinating human and material resources throughout the life of a project by using modern management techniques to achieve predetermined objectives of cost, time, and performance (scope, quality and occupant satisfaction).

·         Communication is a primary project success factor, no matter what the organizational style.

Project Management Functions are…

·         Project Integration

·         Strategic Planning

·         Resource Allocation

·         Scope Management

·         Quality Management

·         Time Management

·         Cost Management

·         Risk Management

The Five Phases of any Project are…

·         Organizing/Initiating

·         Planning/Designing

·         Executing

·         Controlling/Directing

·         Closing Out

 

GCN’s Nonprofit University and IFMA Atlanta will partner to provide the popular Certificate of Nonprofit Facility Management again in 2015, with dates to be announced soon. To learn more, visit the series curriculum page.

 

Ken Bryson serves as a Project Officer and Project Manager in the Construction Management Office of the Asset Management Services Office at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, where he has been responsible for the development and management of numerous projects associated with repairs and improvements on CDC’s various campuses. He is a LEED Accredited Professional and a member of the American Institute of Architects, as well as a board member of the Atlanta Chapter of the International Facility Management Association (IFMA) where he served as president in 2013-2014.

Ken Stephenson is a Team Leader in the Construction Management Office of the Asset Management Services Office at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). He has been responsible for planning, design, construction, furnishing and operations and maintenance aspects of CDC facilities. Ken is a Certified Facility Manager, a member of the American Institute of Architects, and a board member of the Atlanta Chapter of the International Facility Management Association (IFMA). 

Add new comment

Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.
Subscribe to GCN Blog RSS